Are whole grains healthy?

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Are whole grains healthy?

Post  American Zombie on Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:02 pm

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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  Forum Gawd on Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:20 pm

RC wrote:

Don't believe the lies I eat tht shit nd got ripped..
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  TumbleWeed on Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:45 pm

Any processed and artificially preserved foods are going to bad for you. Popular white breads like "Wonder Bread" are some of the worst since it's gone through a selective production process and has been roller-ground as opposed to stone-ground. In the roller-ground method, the bran of the grain is removed which results in the loss of much of the vital nutrients like lecithin and vitamin E as well as essential omega 3 fatty acids, as a result, the overall nutritional value is greatly decreased.

Factor in the bleaching process (which further eliminates nutrients) as well as the artificial preservatives, and you mostly have a recipe for bad health. Many, if not most of the breads advertised as "whole wheat", go through this same process and only contain a small amount of actual whole grains. Most contain primarily white flour.

"Modern mills use serrated and flat cast iron rollers to separate the bran and germ from the endosperm. The endosperm is ground to create white flour which may be recombined with the bran and germ to create whole wheat or graham flour." (Wikipedia)

Before the "invention" of sliced-bread, bread was produced the way it has been produced for centuries, if not millennium - the stone-ground way and with no-artificial preservation. Stone-grinding preserves all of the essential nutrients and retains the integrity of the grains. 100% natural bread like this can usually only be found in backside farming communities and farmer venues. These breads don't last more then a couple days, as opposed to weeks or even months like most common breads of today, before going bad, which is why they aren't mass-produced. Society prefers convenience over health, sadly.
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  American Zombie on Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:56 pm

I'm sure real whole grains that people ate hundreds of years ago weren't as bad as what we have now.

I switched to whole gains about 3 years ago to try eating healthier and after 2 and a half years I started to get stomach and gut discomfort plus gained extra fat. My blood sugar was in the diabetic range. I cut the gains completely and its been the best thing Ive done so far. That's not to say that everyone should cut grains completely, but definitely take note of how you feel while eating high amounts of grains, specifically gluten proteins, and see how you feel while going long periods of time not eating them.
Being anti government as I am, when I see the gov food pyramid where they suggest grains/carbs should be the main part of the diet, I have to believe the truth is the exact opposite.
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  TumbleWeed on Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:24 pm

RC wrote:I'm sure real whole grains that people ate hundreds of years ago weren't as bad as what we have now.

They weren't bad at all, quite the contrary, actually. Natural whole grains where the bran has not been separated from the grain is 100% beneficial to our bodies. Correct me If I'm wrong, but it seems to me like you're confusing natural whole grains with refined grains. Refined grains lack virtually all vital nutrients, (though some have been fortified). Natural whole grains do not. Naturally produced/non-preserved whole grains are high in fiber, nutrients, and are rich in antioxidants and heart healthy fats like omega 3, all of which have been medically proven to be extremely beneficial.

Studies show that eating whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases. And as I mentioned earlier, most of the stuff sold in stores going under the guise as "whole grain" is crap.


My advice; find a basic/olden bread recipe somewhere, gather the grains, and make your own bread. Only way to be 100% sure you're eating the real deal. Haven't tried it myself, but it's worth a shot for those that are health minded.

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Last edited by NYTE on Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  TumbleWeed on Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:43 pm

Whole Grains Protect against Heart Disease

Itís been all over the news for years: eat more whole grains to protect your heart, lower cholesterol, and ward off chronic disease. But there havenít been many studies actually showing how much and what types of whole grains provide this protection, until now.

ďOur findings have important public health implications and provide a sound scientific basis for advising the daily consumption of three servings of whole grain foods to combat cardiovascular disease,Ē said UK researchers in a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

When itís better to be unrefined

The new trial aimed to see how diets rich in whole grains (whole wheat, with or without oats) stacked up against a refined grain diet when it comes to heart disease risk.

More than 200 middle-aged people at risk for heart disease were divided into three groups:

one group was advised to eat whole wheat products three times per day (comprising 80 grams of whole wheat bread and 40 grams of whole wheat cereal),
another group had one serving of whole wheat and two servings of oats, and
the third ate a diet including refined cereals and white bread.
Blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and measures of inflammation and insulin sensitivity were assessed throughout the 12-week study.

By the end of the study, systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) decreased significantly in both whole grain groups compared with the refined grain group, translating to a projected 15% reduction in coronary artery disease incidence and 25% decrease in stroke incidence. (Other markers of cardiovascular disease risk remained unchanged in all groups, except for cholesterol levels, which actually went down in the refined grain group.)

People eating the refined grain diet got more vitamin D and B vitamins in their diets, but this didnít seem to affect blood pressure levels. ďThis may indicate that the potential bioactivity of the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) is more marked when part of the natural grain product is present compared with the fortified food,Ē said the authors.

How to get those grains

With lots of media attention on whole foods, itís easier than ever to find whole grain versions of your favorite foods in stores.

Here are a few places that you can focus on whole grains that can make a big difference in your health.

Choose whole wheat or other whole grain pastas. These have come a long way over the years, and many brands have perfected a smooth texture much like that of traditional white pasta.
Get into porridge. A simple way to meet your whole grain quotient is by choosing a hot cereal for breakfast. These come in whole wheat, 7-grain, and of course the old standby, oatmeal.
Switch to whole grain breads. You might have to get used to the nuttier flavor and darker color, but whole grain bread is a taste you wonít want to go back on. For choosy children (or if you really have the hankering for a softer consistency), give white whole wheat bread a try. White whole wheat flour also substitutes well in any recipe calling for white flour.
(Am J Clin Nutr 2010;92:733Ė40)

Kimberly Beauchamp, ND, is a licensed, board-certified naturopathic physician with a passion for real food. Dr. Beauchamp received her doctoral degree from Bastyr University, the nationís premier academic institution for science-based natural medicine. She co-founded South County Naturopaths in Wakefield, RI, where she practiced whole family care with an emphasis on nutritional counseling, herbal medicine, detoxification, and food allergy identification and treatment. Her blog, Eat Happy, helps take the confusion out of healthful eating with real food recipes and up-to-the minute nutrition news that you can use.

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/health/feature/whole-grains-protect-against-heart-disease/~default
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  TumbleWeed on Fri Aug 24, 2012 5:11 pm

Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, Oldways and the Whole Grains Council have compiled a summary of research on whole grains and health that has been undertaken since the 2005 Dietary Guidelines.

Here's a snippet of their findings:

THE MAIN BENEFITS OF WHOLE GRAINS

The benefits of whole grains most documented by repeated studies include:

stroke risk reduced 30-36%
type 2 diabetes risk reduced 21-30%
heart disease risk reduced 25-28%
better weight maintenance
Other benefits indicated by recent studies include:

reduced risk of asthma
healthier carotid arteries
reduction of inflammatory disease risk
lower risk of colorectal cancer
healthier blood pressure levels
less gum disease and tooth loss



Click below for the full study in PDF.

SUMMARIES OF RECENT WHOLE GRAIN HEALTH RESEARCH
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  southsiderifa on Sun Sep 02, 2012 1:57 pm

facepalm

its hard to find healthy things these days
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  Forum Gawd on Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:51 pm

southsiderifa wrote: facepalm

its hard to find healthy things these days

Well Yeah If Your LookinG for Healthy Shit In The Candy Bar Aisle.!! Laughing

But Naw Yeah I Was Just Talking To My Girl About This How There Isnt Easy To Find Real Whole Grain Bread.!! I Always Wondered What Was The Difference Because Someone Once Told Me About This.!!
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  American Zombie on Sun Sep 02, 2012 3:45 pm

Theirs a lot of problems with grains, specifically whole grains as we know them today. But the main problem I see with them is the amount of gluten in it. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barely and rye.

most people will not have an issue with gluten at first, but it seems that as humans consume larger and larger amounts, theirs more and more diseases linked to it.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292448/?tool=pubmed

It is now becoming apparent that reactions to gluten are not limited to CD, rather we now appreciate the existence of a spectrum of gluten-related disorders. The high frequency and wide range of adverse reactions to gluten raise the question as to why this dietary protein is toxic for so many individuals in the world. One possible explanation is that the selection of wheat varieties with higher gluten content has been a continuous process during the last 10,000 years, with changes dictated more by technological rather than nutritional reasons. Wheat varieties grown for thousands of years and mostly used for human nutrition up to the Middle Ages, such as Triticum monococcum and T. dicoccum, contain less quantities of the highly toxic 33-mer gluten peptide [65]. Apparently the human organism is still largely vulnerable to the toxic effects of this protein complex, particularly due to a lack of adequate adaptation of the gastrointestinal and immunological responses.

Additionally, gluten is one of the most abundant and diffusely spread dietary components for most populations, particularly those of European origin. In Europe, the mean consumption of gluten is 10 g to 20 g per day, with segments of the general population consuming as much as 50 g of daily gluten or more [66,67] All individuals, even those with a low degree of risk, are therefore susceptible to some form of gluten reaction during their life span. Therefore, it is not surprising that during the past 50 years we have witnessed an 'epidemic' of CD [68,69] and the surging of new gluten-related disorders, including the most recently described GS [44,62]. This review provides some rationale to explain these epidemiological phenomena and expands our current knowledge to gain more insights into gluten-related disorders.

It appears that exposure to gluten may lead to increased gut permeability, a condition researchers now believe is what leads to many autoimmune disorders.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16635908
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18485912
The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and to electrolytes and water homeostasis. A more attentive analysis of the anatomic and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, however, suggests that another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiological modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the finely tuned zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by reestablishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. This review is timely given the increased interest in the role of a "leaky gut" in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions targeting both the intestine and extraintestinal organs.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248165







In the end, I think whether someone reacts to gluten depends on a few factors. Your overall diet, your stress levels, your gut bacteria balance, and your genes...
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Re: Are whole grains healthy?

Post  American Zombie on Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:57 pm

Good blog talking about why modern wheat is likely far more problematic then wheat from decades ago.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-problems-with-modern-wheat/#axzz29gSM3iHy
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